01
Sep
08

1978 Toyota Cressida

It’s old, it’s starting to rust, but it still hasn’t lost it’s touch. This Japanese Sedan carries a 110hp 2.6L inline six, the same engine in the first Supra. A Wikipedia editor claims it was known as a “four-door Supra“. Did I mention it’s RWD?

It isn’t just sporty, it’s classy. Before Toyota founded Lexus, it made it’s own luxury vehicles. The Cressida was Toyota’s inspiration for Lexus. Aside from the Century, the Cressida was top notch. In a way, it’s a 1970’s Lexus IS-F. It all comes at a price, even it’s own ad claims it to be “the expensive Toyota”. Not the best marketing if you ask me.

It looks nice too. The grille passionately displays the retro Toyota logo. Surrounding the grille are large, circular headlights that look ripped straight from an early 70’s Trans-Am.

The side displays a silver doohickey on the C-pillar which really tidies things up (Comment if you can tell me what it’s called, I’d really like to know!) . The American trim has it’s mirrors beside the A pillar instead of right behind the front wheel, as in the Japanese trim.

The rear displays blocky taillights. The bumper shows the most signs of rust on the car.

Now, it’s the interior that really displays the car’s age. The Dashboard is falling apart due to sun damage. The light on the ceiling is cloudy, the seats are falling apart, and even the blankets we put over the deck behind the back seats looks molded to the car. However, the seats are comfy, the radio works, all the gauges work fine, the air conditioning works better than the one in my parents Plymouth Voyager or Chrysler Grand Voyager, and what can go wrong with three horn buttons? The inside carries lots of memories.

Now, there’s got to be a downside to such a great car, and that’s this: My parents own four cars and they’re running out of room. All of them are starting to break. Sometime we’ll need a new car, which means we’ll get rid of an old car. Out of the four, this one is the oldest, and it may be the one to go. I want it, but that would make them have to hold it all through my college years, which they’re not a fan of. But this is my third favorite car, trailing behind a Porsche 911 (930) Turbo and a 1973 Pontiac Trans-Am. I’ll find out a way to get it.

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3 Responses to “1978 Toyota Cressida”


  1. 1 Antonio
    October 11, 2008 at 7:35 am

    I would suggest you keep it. Have it painted and have the interior fixed and you get a Retro Jap car!

  2. 2 Antonio
    October 11, 2008 at 7:37 am

    I have a 23 year old creassida and it works well. What I did is I bought a second hand 1JZ-GTE engine and intalled it. The car can out run just about any car in the free way.

  3. 3 theautomotivation
    October 13, 2008 at 2:46 am

    That’s exactly what I plan to do with it, after I get a summer job, as well as my license. I’ve already been scoping out engines that would make a good transplant and the 1JZ-GTE is the one I found that seemed the best. Great minds think alike.


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